Tag Archives: medical

Orbis Moonwalkers 2017

27 Sep


Walking in the dark is no longer dull and dreary! So come along to the Moonwalkers night walkathon and join others in conquering darkness and enlightening the world and at the same time raise funds for Orbis!


Date: Saturday, 2 December 2017

Time: Overnight from 9:00pm Saturday (December 2) to 07:00am the next morning

Route: Mong Kok Fa Hui Park to Sai Kung Pier 20km on pavement

Dress Code: To match with the theme, participants are encouraged to dress up in black and white stripes.

Blindfold Experience: Participants will blindfold and complete a 10-minute walk at designated location

Moonwalkers App: To unlock secret codes that will allow you to complete missions and escape from darkness to receive an e-certificate

Shuttle Bus Service: 1:00am –7:00am on Sunday December 3, 2017 from Sai Kung Pier to Kwun Tong MTR Station

Price:
Individual Minimum Sponsorship – $780
Team – 8 members or above Minimum Sponsorship – HK$ 750 per member
Corporate – 10 members or above Minimum Sponsorship – HK$ 850 per member

To register, please follow this link

Enrollment Deadline: 5:00pm Tuesday 24 October 2017

About Orbis:
Orbis1ORBIS Hong Kong was established in early 90s when a group of impassioned individuals who shared the dream of a world free from preventable blindness came together to raise public awareness about eye care issues. That same year, three high-profile supporters donated US$14 million to fund the purchase of a DC-10 airplane to replace the existing DC-8 Flying Eye Hospital. The biggest of these supporters was leading local businessman Mr. Y.C. Ho, who generously donated US$7 million of the DC-10’s cost. He and his fellow donors’ extraordinary kindness succeeded in instantly raising awareness about ORBIS’s presence in Hong Kong and its worldwide sight-saving work.

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SRDC Step out for Children raising money for Mitochondrial Disease Diagnostic Tests

26 Aug

The Society for the Relief of Disabled Children will be hosting “Step out for Children” to fund Mitochondrial Disease Diagnostic Tests on 24th September, 2017. A treasure hunt is held along the 1.5 km route in Waterfront Park when a carnival will be organized at Ocean View Court in The Arcade. There will be fun games related to mitochondrial disease.

What are Mitochondrial disorders?
Mitochondrial disease is an inherited chronic illness that can be present at birth or develop later in life. It causes debilitating physical, developmental, and cognitive disabilities with symptoms including poor growth; loss of muscle coordination; muscle weakness and pain; seizures; vision and/or hearing loss; gastrointestinal issues; learning disabilities; and organ failure. It is estimated that 1 in 4,000 people has Mito. It’s progressive and there is no cure. – MitoAction

Details: Treasure Hunt along the 1.5 km route in Waterfront Park with carnival inside The Arcade
First 800 participants will receive a gift bag
Participant Certificate will be provided

Date: Sunday, 24 September 2017

Time: 10am – 4pm

Place: Ocean View Court, The Arcade, Cyberport

Price: Minimum donation of $250 per participant

For more information and to enroll, please visit their website

About The Society for the Relief of Disabled Children (SRDC): The Society for the Relief of Disabled Children (SRDC) was established in 1953, with the mission to provide medical, surgical, rehabilitation and educational services to disabled children in Hong Kong. The Society, using funds generated by the generosity of the community, established a convalescent home in Sandy Bay in 1955 for children stricken with skeletal tuberculosis. The home initially had only 50 beds but was subsequently expanded in stages to become the Duchess of Kent Children’s Hospital at Sandy Bay (DKCH) in 1968 and was in the frontline fighting against tuberculosis, poliomyelitis and spinal deformities. The Hospital subsequently became internationally recognized for this work and remains a training center for surgeons and health workers from around the world.

The Society was responsible for the running cost of the Home and Hospital and ran the institutions on a day-to-day basis until 1991 when the Hong Kong Hospital Authority took over management of all public hospitals in Hong Kong. Despite the change in management, the Society still has a significant influence in the running of the Hospital and has continued to support the Hospital with specific needs or in emerging areas of child health that are not readily available in the public health care system. They have also expanded into other areas of medical social concerns that fulfill the mission of the Society.

Currently, the Society is continuously supporting the following:
* Equipment purchase or upgrade at The Duchess of Kent Children’s Hospital at Sandy Bay
* The Kids on the Block Puppet Troupe
* Doctor Fellowship Program – Overseas Orthopaedic Surgeons
* China Patient Project
* Implant Sponsorship
* Others, e.g. clinical research at HKU

Volunteer for ReSource The Counselling Centre

18 Aug

ReSource The Counselling Centre was established over 40 years ago as a registered charitable organisation offering multi-lingual professional counselling service for people residing in Hong Kong. The organisation has grown considerably since then. At the present they have more than ten counsellors. All their counsellors are trained to a high standard and experienced. They see clients for many reasons. For example, relationship difficulties, parenting issues, anxiety, stress, depression and bereavement.

ReSource is a multicultural organisation and at present can offer counselling in at least seven languages – English, Cantonese, Putonghua, Russian, Hindi, Marathi and Marwadi. Their statistics show that they see approximately 55% Chinese speaking clients, the remaining 45% of our clients are counselled in English or other languages.

As an Organisational Member of British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy ReSource is bound by its Ethical Framework for Good Practice in Counselling and Psychotherapy and subject to the Professional Conduct Procedure therein.

What you can do to help:
Part-Time English Speaking Counsellor / Part-Time Bilingual Counsellor

Mature persons needed to provide counselling services, including child/ family/ personal/ marital relationship counselling. Must be fluent in English and have a minimun of 2 years counselling experience. Only a holder of a Master’s degree or higher in either counselling, social work or clincal psychology need apply.
Would be required to work flexible hours including some evenings and/ or Saturday.

Interested please email: wingo.resource@counselling.org.hk

Volunteer for Health in Action

3 Aug

Asylum seekers and refugees (ASRs) have limited rights in Hong Kong and they are a group of marginalized and ignored population. Due to the backlog of the screening process, it is not unusual for an ASR to stay in Hong Kong for years, some of them have stayed in Hong Kong for over ten years. They are prohibited to engage in any form of businesses or jobs, except in rare exceptions. During the lengthy screening process and long waiting time, ASRs can only live under limited government and NGO subsidies. Despite their long stay, they are often detached from the society and there is little public awareness of their presence in the city.

Health in Action is a humanitarian organization established in 2011 in Hong Kong, with a focus in promoting community health and wellbeing through the empowerment of underprivileged populations in Hong Kong and in Southeast Asia. Their work is rooted in the core belief that every human being has the right to health. They offer support to people based on health needs, irrespective of race, religion, gender or political affiliation. Health In Action is a registered charity in Hong Kong and is a member of the Hong Kong Council of Social Service.

Health In Action advocates health equity for the underprivileged, including ASRs in Hong Kong. The right to health implies that the government should provide accessible and acceptable basic healthcare to all living in the city. This also includes other health-related services such as nutritious food and safe housing etc. The right to health enshrined in international human rights treaties, such as International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, is applicable to Hong Kong. ASRs can attend basic medical services at public hospitals with their fees waived. However, experience from ASRs show that there are multiple factors hindering their health care access, including cultural differences, language barrier, lack of awareness of health needs and financial constraints. All these impose negative effects on the physical and mental health of ASRs.

What you can do to help:
Volunteers are Health in Action’s core valuable assets. Their committed team of multi-disciplinary volunteers is continuously expanding, with professionals including doctors, nurses, pharmacists, dietitians, occupational therapists, clinical psychologists, social workers, lawyers and more. University students are also a crucial part of their taskforce. Health in Action welcomes volunteers of all backgrounds and experiences to join them in working towards health equity.

If you are interested in joining Health in Action as a volunteer, please do not hesitate to let them know by emailing hia@hia.org.hk.

Volunteer for the Hong Kong Alliance for Rare Diseases

23 May

A rare disease is any uncommon disease with a very low prevalence rate. There are over 6,000 diseases identified as rare diseases worldwide. Most rare diseases are caused by genetic defects or mutation and are found during childhood or even early infancy. In most of the cases, they pose serious threat to a patient’s entire life with extreme disabilities affecting quality of life. Some of them are even degenerative and life-threatening.

The definition for rare diseases differs among different organisations and jurisdictions, as follows: 6.5 to 10 cases in every 10,000 by World Health Organization (WHO); less than 7 in every 10,000 in the US; less than 5 in every 10,000 in the European Union (EU); and less than 1 in every 10,000 in Taiwan.

Some commonly known rare diseases identified in Hong Kong include Mucopolysaccharidosis, Pompe Disease, Infantile Cutaneous and Articular Syndrome, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, Myelofibrosis, Marfan Syndrome, Spinocerebellar Ataxia, Muscular Atrophy, Fabry Disease, Gaucher Disease, Achondroplasia, various forms of Osteochondrodysplasias, Inborn Errors of Metabolism and Mitochondrial Diseases. Most of the rare diseases are genetic in nature. In spite of a very few reported cases, rare diseases present a real threat to patients’ health, and bring heavy burden to their families.

Hong Kong has in place a world-renowned public health policy, and a healthcare system of high standard. However, we lag far behind in terms of prevention, diagnosis, treatment and protection of rare disease patients, as compared with many countries and places in Europe, US, and Asia. Government has not come up with a clear definition of rare diseases, or formulated related policies. The general public, including some healthcare professionals and social workers, have inadequate understanding and knowledge about rare diseases.

What Hong Kong Alliance for Rare Diseases does
* Enhance understanding of rare diseases among patients, carers and their families; promote self-help and mutual support and positive attitude, towards leading a more fulfilling life.
* Promote public education on rare diseases, strengthen community awareness, understanding and support for patients, their families and related self-help organisations.
* Ensure rare disease patients and their families’ needs and views are represented via policy advocacy and dialogues with Government authorities; leading to the formulation of proper support policies and services to address their needs in medical care, rehabilitation, education, welfare and social participation.
* Support and assist in rare disease-related research study.
* Unite rare disease patients, families, self-help organisations, healthcare professionals and academia, media and other stakeholders, promote collaboration and exchange.
* Promote dialogues, consultation and collaboration among related rare disease organisations in Hong Kong, Mainland China and overseas.

What you can do to help
The Hong Kong Alliance for Rare Diseases organises various events and activities to promote community awareness and support for rare disease patients and families. They invite you to act now and register as their volunteer.

Please download and fill in the Volunteer Registration Form by following this link, and email to info@hkard.org

UNICEF 2017 Little Artists Big Dreams Drawing Competition

2 Apr


Join China Children’s Week 2017 Little Artists Big Dreams Drawing Competition

Hong Kong Committee for UNICEF (UNICEF HK) will hold the China Children’s Week 2017 – Little Artists Big Dreams Drawing Competition on 7 May 2017 (Sunday) at Central Lawn, Nursery Park, West Kowloon Cultural District, Kowloon. The competition to be held one week before Mother’s Day will raise funds for UNICEF’s ‘Cash Transfers for Deprived Children‘ (CCT) Project in China, which will be dedicated to giving a good start in life for every child by improving the maternal and child health services in China.

© UNICEF/UNI49229/LeMoyne

Although families from remote and deprived areas are now entitled to free hospital delivery and healthcare services, suspension of work and high travelling costs make them reluctant to access these services and lead to high maternal and neonatal mortality rates. Since 2013, UNICEF HK has allocated the funds raised in China Children’s Week to the CCT project launched by UNICEF in 15 counties in Yunnan, Gansu and Sichuan. Through the initiative, women from underprivileged families will receive cash subsidies, enabling their access to prenatal and postnatal checkups, hospital delivery and vaccinations for their babies. By 26 January 2017, a total of 16,806 women and children under 1 year old have been benefitted from this project.

By joining the Little Artists Big Dreams Drawing Competition, children can celebrate an early Mother’s Day. While expressing their love to mothers in the drawings, these little artists can also raise funds for mothers and children in rural China, championing the spirit of ‘kids helping kids’. UNICEF sincerely invites all little artists aged 12 or below to participate in this meaningful fundraising event for CCT Project, ensuring a healthy good start for children.

Date: Sunday, 7 May 2017

Time: 12 – 6pm

Place: Central Lawn, Nursery Park, West Kowloon Cultural District, Kowloon (Carnival will be set up in Sunset Lawn)

Price: $180 donation

To register please go to their website

© UNICEF HK/2016

This competition is open for children who are 12 or under.
There are 3 age groups
Group A: 6 years old or under (Born in 2011 or after)
Group B: 7-9 years old (Born between 2008 and 2010)
Group C: 10-12 years old (Born between 2005 and 2007)
Awards: 1st Prize, 2nd Prize, 3rd Prize and 20 Consolation Prizes for each age group;
Most Popular Award (online voting);
Overall Champion;
All participants will receive a certificate of participation.
The 3 organization with most participants will receive a certificate.

7 April 2017 (Friday) Deadline for submission of printed application form
21 April 2017 (Friday) Deadline for online application
Late April 2017 Confirmation emails to all applications, this email will be used for registration on event day
7 May 2017 (Sunday) China Children’s Week 2017 – Little Artists Big Dreams Drawing Competition
To be announced Official results and prize collection announcements on the website

About UNICEF: UNICEF promotes the rights and well-being of every child, in everything they do. Together with their partners, they work in 190 countries and territories to translate that commitment into practical action, focusing special effort on reaching the most vulnerable and excluded children, to the benefit of all children, everywhere.

UNICEF believes all children have a right to survive, thrive and fulfill their potential – to the benefit of a better world.

UNICEF is a leading humanitarian and development agency working globally for the rights of every child. Child rights begin with safe shelter, nutrition, protection from disaster and conflict and traverse the life cycle: pre-natal care for healthy births, clean water and sanitation, health care and education.

UNICEF has spent nearly 70 years working to improve the lives of children and their families. Working with and for children through adolescence and into adulthood requires a global presence whose goal is to produce results and monitor their effects. UNICEF also lobbies and partners with leaders, thinkers and policy makers to help all children realize their rights—especially the most disadvantaged.

Volunteer with New Life Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association

3 Mar

new-life-logoThe New Life Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association was formed in 1959 by a group of people in recovery of mental illness under the name New Life Mutual Aid Club. The organization was formally registered with the authorities in 1961 and re-organized in 1965 under its current title. The Association was incorporated under the Companies Ordinance Act in 1968. It joined the World Federation for Mental Health in 1969, becoming a member of the Hong Kong Council of Social Service in the same year, and became a member of the Community Chest of Hong Kong in 1970.

New Life strives to promote mental wellness for people in recovery of mental illness and for their families and the general public with the ultimate goal of equal opportunities, social inclusion, acceptance and full participation for all in the community.

New Life is dedicated to pioneering and delivering people-focused, recovery-oriented, and evidence-based community mental health services with care and respect, innovation and continuous drive for excellence and professionalism.

Promoting Recovery and Body & Mind Wellness have always been the core values of our services. By means of a wide variety of community psychiatric rehabilitation services, New Life endeavours to help people in recovery of mental illness lead independent lives, make their employment choices in alignment with their own interests and abilities, obtain employment in the open labour market, participate in social and leisure activities in the community and, ultimately, attain a desirable quality of living so as to live out a life characterized by holistic good health and body-mind equilibrium.

Services include
new-life-4New Life Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association offers Residential Services covering 2 long stay care homes, 11 halfway houses, 2 hostels for moderately mentally handicapped, 4 self-financed hostels and one sub vented supported hostel in addition to residential respite services and support services.

new-life-3New Life Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association operates four sheltered workshops, including New Life Farm and three industrial type sheltered workshops. Sheltered workshops provide people in recovery of mental illness (PIR) and people with disabilities with a working environment specially designed for vocational training through an income-generating work process facilitating the development of potentials and confidence of PIR to prepare them for open employment and community reintegration.

For a complete list of New Life’s services, please visit their website

What you can do to help
People in recovery of mental illness are frequently faced with frustration, confusion, social-stigma as well as self-stigma while they are en route to recovery. Medication side-effects, difficulties in adapting to work, interpersonal relationship and family are just but a few burdens that are laid heavily on their shoulders. Volunteers are their dear supporters, rendering encouragement and loving care that they need in order to overcome the hurdles and regain a life with vitality and dignity.

Volunteers are also the driving force that helps change the general public’s attitude towards mental health issues. Due to either misconception or unawareness, or the combination of both, people in general are reluctant to face mental health problems head-on, often resulting in delayed intervention and stigma being developed towards people in recovery of mental illness. With their enthusiasm and positive attitude, volunteers counter this negative thinking and help advocate community attention to mental health issues. The effects volunteers bring about would surely help people in recovery of mental illness integrate better into the society and develop their potential to the full.

If you are interested in joining with New Life as volunteers, please download and fill out the Volunteer Application Form and send it back to New Life by mail or fax. (Address: 332 Nam Cheong Street, Kowloon, Fax: 2770 9345). New Life will match volunteer work in accordance with your personal interests and preference, making effective use of your time, skills and experience.

Young adults welcome.