Tag Archives: medical

China Coast Community

2 Mar

China Coast Community Limited (CCC) was set up in 1978. It is approved as a charity under Section 88 of the Inland Revenue Ordinance.

The history of CCC dates back to March, 1978 when the Reverend Stephen Sidebotham, the Dean of St John’s Cathedral, convened a meeting of those concerned with care of the elderly then in Hong Kong. A detailed survey revealed that there was an urgent need for residential facilities for people in Hong Kong whose main language was English and the concept of CCC was born.

In 1979, through the support of the Hong Kong Jockey Club and an interest-free loan from the Hong Kong Government, 63 Cumberland Road was purchased and converted into residential accommodation for eight residents. This was subsequently extended in 1982 to provide additional facilities at the Home, financed by generous donations from a number of individual and corporate benefactors.

Presently, there are 38 Residents whose needs have changed drastically over the years resulting in the CCC becoming fully licensed as a Care and Attention Home in April 2000 with professional Nursing Care provided on a 24 hour basis.

Most of their new admissions are still active people when they enter CCC. However, they have the security of knowing if they become less able or highly dependent they will be cared for with respect and dignity.

China Coast Community’s Future: In 2015 the China Coast Community commissioned a feasibility study to redevelop the CCC site and build a first-class facility that would meet the increasing healthcare and social needs of residents into the future. The new facility could accommodate a residential home for 45 residents, of quality and respect for privacy and personal space that they feel is appropriate for the 21st century. To accomplish their vision for the future and to continue to care for their residents, the China Coast Community needs to raise HK$90-120m. This is in addition to their running costs of HK$3.5m per annum.

What you can do to help:
Your generous donation helps the China Coast Community cover various operating expenses. Though operating costs increase every year, they continually seek ways to improve care and the quality of life for their elderly family. Your kind contribution will help them adapt without compromising service standards. CCC is a charity registered under section 88 of the Inland Revenue Ordinance of Hong Kong. Any donation over HK$100 may be used for tax deduction purposes. To find out how you can donate, please follow this link.

Donation of Skills and Time
The China Coast Community have a wonderful handyman on staff, but as a large residential home there are always things that could use a little TLC. If you are a seamstress, electrician, plumber, carpenter, craftsman, and can donate your skills, tools and time, please email ccchome@netvigator.com


Society for the Promotion of Hospice Care

20 Feb

The Society for the Promotion of Hospice Care believes that everyone has the right to live with dignity at every turn of life, even towards the end of it. They envision a world in which all people can pursue a quality hospice and palliative care and receive bereavement support that enable them to live a full and positive life when facing death, and die with dignity and peace.

The Society seeks to transform the lives of everyone in Hong Kong by advocating hospice and palliative care, and providing bereavement support services. Working in collaboration with local communities, partnering organizations and the government, They offer life and death education programmes to local communities, organize hospice and palliative care training to health care professionals, the general public and beyond.

Influencing Beliefs and Attitudes
* Heighten community and professional awareness on issues surrounding death, dying and bereavement.
* Facilitate open discussion on death and dying while respecting cultural, religious and family beliefs.

Meeting Community Needs
* Provide readily available information about facing death and end of life care options.
* Offer comprehensive bereavement support to patients, family & carers enabling them to cope with issues of loss and grief.

Enhancing Understanding & Skills
* Increase understanding through the ongoing discussion of end of life care among health care providers.
* Strengthen health care professional development through the provision of specialized training and support.
* Encourage and support in end of life care research.

Advocating for Best Possible Care
* Collaborate with caregivers from different disciplines to enhance their practices on the care of the dying and the bereaved.
* Help people who are dying and their families to recognize that the choice to receive quality end of life care is their right.
* Work towards greater recognition in end of life care and greater access to the best possible end of life care for all.

What you can do to help
For the Society for the Promotion of Hospice Care, a volunteer is a valuable partner. It is their volunteers’ enthusiasm and continuous participation that help them to “add life to days when day cannot be added to life”. With volunteers, the Society is able to minimize their operating cost and channel funds raised directly to the people in need. A volunteer can help in many aspects of the Society’s work including:

To organize and develop new fundraising events or to assist in coordinating and performing logistical duties at fundraising activities

Administration Work
To assist in general office duties to help reduce administrative costs

Translation and Technical Works
To assist in translation, photo-taking, website update and artwork design, to name but a few

Bereavement Counselling Support
Following up bereaved families via phone or home visits, providing simple home assistance and assist counsellors in organizing activities

Hotline and Reception Services
Help manage the enquiry hotline or attend duty at the reception of JCHH

If you would like to become a volunteer, simply download and fill out the application form, fax, email or mail to the Society.

Tai Po Bus Accident – Red Cross Blood Drive

11 Feb

In light of the horrific bus accident in Tai Po yesterday, the Hong Kong Red Cross has issued an urgent appeal for blood donations. All aged 16-66, weighing more than 41kg and healthy are welcome to donate.

To facilitate members of the public going to donate blood, the daily service hours of the blood donation stations at Causeway Bay, Tsuen Wan and Kwun Tong under the Hong Kong Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service have been extended to 8pm.

* Causeway Bay Blood Donation Station
Address: 14 / F, Plaza 2000, 2-4 Russell Street, Causeway Bay
Opening hours: Monday to Sunday and public holidays from 11 am to 8 pm

* Tsuen Wan Blood Donation Station
Address: 8 River Road, Tsuen Wan
Opening hours: Monday to Sunday and public holidays from 11 am to 8 pm

* Kwun Tong blood donation station
Address: Room 2301 and 2316, 23 / F, City 5, Millennium City, Kwun Tong Road
Opening hours: Monday to Sunday and public holidays from 11 am to 8 pm

About Hong Kong Red Cross: The Hong Kong Red Cross (“HKRC”) was established in 1950 as a branch of the British Red Cross Society. Since 1 July 1997, upon the return of Hong Kong’s sovereignty to China, the HKRC has changed its affiliation to become a highly autonomous branch of the Red Cross Society of China.


Social Career a platform for getting involved

16 Dec

If your resolution for the year is to volunteer and you don’t know where to start, take a look at Social Career

What is Social Career?
Social Career is a non-profit technology organization registered in Hong Kong in 2015 and a registered charity under section 88 of the Inland Revenue ordinance (File no: 91/15011). With funding support from The Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust, Social Career is building a platform that encourages the general public to volunteer and get involved in social causes and service activities.

Their vision is to be in a world where everyone has a second career outside of their work. Everyone deserves an opportunity to develop a second career that we are truly passionate about. They call this our Social Career. You can have a fulfilling Social Career regardless of your profession, education or your social status; it’s about who you are and your impact on society through volunteering. Your Social Career will carry on even after you have retired from your daily job.

Social Career’s mission is to educate the general public in volunteerism and involvement in social causes and services. To achieve this mission, they devote their knowledge and experience of applying latest information technology to develop a platform that helps non-profit organizations and enterprises with a social mission to encourage and manage long-term and skill-based volunteering activities.

Which role are you interested in?
Administrative assistant, coach/teacher, mentor, performer/entertainer, program assistant, care taker, cleaner/repairer, … there is a lot to choose from

Who do you want to help?
The variety of non-profits looking for help is vast. They include charities providing services to infants and children, women, elderly, new arrivals, ethnic minorities, the disabled, homeless, animals, refugees, and the list goes on

How do you Volunteer?
Just register by following this link, look at the volunteer opportunities on their website or on their app. Like it? Sign up, it’s that easy!


March2One Charity Raffle 2017

6 Dec

March2One’ Charity Raffle is named after World Down Syndrome Day21 March. Buy a raffle ticket, or a book to support service development of the Hong Kong Down Syndrome Association and so as to improve the quality of life of service users. The goal of the raffle is also to raise public awareness of people with Down Syndrome and other disabilities as well as the importance of the social inclusion.

List of Raffle Prizes

People with Down Syndrome and other disabilities should be respected, building friendships with us in an integrated society.

To buy raffle tickets, follow this link to HKDSA’s website and download the order form. Please fill in and send to HKDSA on or before 3 January 2018. For further enquiries, please feel free to contact HKDSA’s Administrative Assistant (Fundraising and Administrative), Ms. Shirley Chan at 3590 2565.

Deadline: 3 January 2018

Draw Date: 12 January 2018

Price: Each booklet costs HK$200 with 20 raffle tickets

About Hong Kong Down Syndrome Association: Registered as a non-profit-making organization since October 1987, the Hong Kong Down Syndrome Association is committed to serving individuals with Down Syndrome, intellectual disabilities or other disabilities and their family members with integrated family support and vocational rehabilitation services. HKDSA’s objective is to enable service users to develop their personal growth fully in every aspect of life, as well as to meet their employment and vocational training needs. In recent years, HKDSA has been expanding their social enterprises with a view of increasing vocational training and job opportunities for people with disabilities while promoting the concept of “social inclusion”.


Clearly – help the 2.5 billion people around the world who suffer from poor vision to see

6 Nov


Why vision matters:
Imagine how different your life would be if one day you woke up with poor vision and could not get the treatment you needed to correct it. If you struggled to see your friends, your family, your phone, and your feet. Almost every aspect of your life would change in an instant. For many, the problems you’re imagining are just a part of everyday life.

Being able to see clearly makes it easier to learn, to work and to realise your full potential – but right now, 2.5 billion people are being held back from these opportunities.

If your eyes have been opened to the importance of clear vision, you can help by signing the petition to global leaders to tell them that now is the time to take action.

At the Commonwealth Summit in April 2018, some of the world’s most powerful people will meet in London to agree on a shared path to progress for 52 countries and more than 2 billion people living in the Commonwealth.

Clear vision must be a priority, and with your support it can be. Clearly is asking Commonwealth leaders to put vision on their agenda for the Summit. Clearly will make sure your voice is heard. To sign the petition, please follow this link

About Clearly: Clearly wants to make sure that everyone can get a pair of glasses when they need them, no matter who they are or where they live.

Unlocking human potential:
Being able to see clearly would transform billions of lives. And a world where everyone has access to a pair of glasses would be fairer and more prosperous for all of us.

Clear vision is the golden thread that will help reduce poverty and deliver quality education, decent work and gender equality. The benefits would be felt around the world, but the greatest impact would be in developing countries, which account for 90% of the people living without access to vision correction.

Their roots:
Clearly was founded in 2016 by James Chen. He has been gripped by the issue of poor vision for the last 12 years, leading and funding projects that aim to drive new progress on an age old problem.

James is the co-founder of Adlens, which is revolutionising lens technology with adjustable focus eyewear. He also set up the charity Vision for a Nation in 2011 with the aim of providing nationwide access to eye care and affordable glasses in Rwanda, a country with a population of 12 million. A stunning success, eye care services are now available to all, and more than 2 million people have received vision screenings.

Clearly was launched as a global campaign to enable access to glasses for everyone in the world. James has made it his personal mission that if a human is to set foot on Mars in the years ahead, everyone should be able to see it happen.


TWGHs Charity Challenge Race

1 Nov

Run the TWGHs Charity Challenge Race and raise money for TWGHs Development Fund for the Kwong Wah Hospital Redevelopment project.

About the Charity Challenge Race:

Route Map

The goal of this Charity Challenge Race is to raise funds for TWGHs Development Fund of Kwong Wah Hospital Redevelopment project.
* It’s a fun race with over 6 different obstacle points along the 2.5 kilometre race course to leap over.
* Event includes stage performance and game booths
* There is also a kid-zone designated for children under 12 years old

* Team/ Individual Challenge Race player must be aged 12 or above
* Each team consists of 4 players (minimum 3 players) regardless of gender

Race Format:
Each team player/individual player begins at the starting point, leaping over 6 different obstacle points along the 2.5 kilometre race course to the finishing point. If player fails at the obstacle point or violates the race rules, 60 seconds will be counted as penalty. Player is required to wear a timer inside the penalty zone until penalty time is over. No interference of the timer is allowed.

Team Challenge Race (Corporate/Organization Team and Family and Friends Team)
* Team result is determined by the sum of finishing time of top three players in each team

Individual Challenge Race
* Divided into 4 age groups for male and female players. Result is determined by individual finishing time
* Age group is based on the year of birth. Applicant should register to their respective age group
(Example: If you were born in December 2005, your age group should be age 12-19)

Date: Sunday, 10 December 2017

Time: 7:15am – 12pm (Start time of different categories will be announced by early December 2017)

Place: Lung Wo Road, Central, Hong Kong


Race Categories

For more information on how to register or donate, please visit their website.

About the Kwong Wah Hospital Redevelopment:

Original Kwong Wah Hospital

The Kwong Wah Hospital was established by the Tung Wah Group of Hospitals in 1911 as the first hospital in Kowloon and the New Territories.

Current Kwong Wah Hospital

The hospital underwent a redevelopment in 1958. To update facilities and to expand services a new redevelopment is underway. After this redevelopment, the hospital will provide a patient-oriented environment with the capacity and capability to deliver holistic and seamless healthcare services, in collaboration with other hospitals within the cluster. It will not only retain its role as acute hospital but provide an additional 350 beds and 10 additional operation theatres.
Other additions will include:
Emergency Services – Provision of adequate isolation facilities and 24-hour CT Scan services, and expansion of Emergency and Observation ward.
Outpatient Services – Consultation rooms for specialist out-patient will be expanded from 44 to around 100.
Day Care Medical Services – Provision of one-stop multi-disciplinary services to patients with non-acute conditions at an ambulatory care centre, facilitating patients to receive medical treatments.
New Medical Oncology Services – Including front-line management, consultation services and chemotherapy programmes.
Expanding Chinese and Western Medicine Integration Services so as to provide comprehensive Chinese and Western Medicine Hospital Services.

About Tung Wah Group of Hospitals:
TWGH is probably Hong Kong’s oldest charitable institution. The establishment of TWGHs can be traced back to Kwong Fook I-tsz, a small temple built at Tai Ping Shan Street on the Hong Kong Island in 1851 for people to house the spirit-tablets of their ancestors. As the temple was gradually taken by the sick and the destitute as a refuge, it became reeked with dirt and eventually aroused the concern of the Government and the public. Hence, a group of earnest Chinese community leaders proposed to raise funds and build a hospital in the neighbourhood. In 1869, $115,000 and a piece of land at Po Yan Street, Sheung Wan were granted by the then Governor MacDonnell. The first Chinese hospital in Hong Kong was finally built in 1870 through the enactment of the Tung Wah Hospital Ordinance. Prior to the establishment of the hospital, a temporary clinic was set up by the founding Directors near the hospital premises to offer free medical treatment to those in need. The hospital, named “Tung Wah Hospital”, was constructed in 1872 and started to provide free Chinese medicine services to the sick and the poor. It hence laid a foundation of the charitable work of TWGHs. To meet the imperative demand for medical services resulting from the rapid growth of population, Kwong Wah Hospital in Yaumatei, Kowloon and Tung Wah Eastern Hospital in Causeway Bay, Hong Kong were built and commenced operation in 1911 and 1929 respectively. In 1931, the 3 hospitals were amalgamated into the “Tung Wah Group of Hospitals” under the management of one Board of Directors.

Apart from medical care, TWGHs had been offering various social welfare and education services ever since its beginnings. When the hospital buildings were being constructed, remains were found on the site. A cemetery was then built by the founding Directors to re-bury those remains near the Slaughter House at Kennedy Town which started the Group’s provision of community services. It also started the immediate provision of alms to the needy. It provided assistance to victims whenever there were disasters, and even extended its relief work to mainland China. In 1880, TWGHs started its first free school at the Chung Wah College adjacent to Man Mo Temple on Hollywood Road with the donation income of the temple used to provide free education to the poor. In 1941, with the outbreak of the Pacific War, TWGHs insisted to provide limited medical services in Tung Wah Hospital and Kwong Wah Hospital. It also helped undertake rebuilding work including repatriation of refugees, provision of free food and clothing, taking care of the wounded and burying the dead. Medical services of TWGHs were resumed after the war. In the 1950s and 1960s, TWGHs further established primary and secondary schools and embarked on the development of formal and systematic social welfare services.

With gradual evolution over the past hundred years, TWGHs has now developed into a well-established charitable organization in Hong Kong with a huge recurrent expenditure largely subvented by the Government and only a small portion covered by service users. As TWGHs needs to shoulder the shortfall in funding as well as the cost for developing new services by raising funds from the public, holding fund-raising activities has become imperative to sustain the financial well-being of the Group. To serve the community better, TWGHs will continue to dedicate its efforts in providing diversified and high quality services for the people of Hong Kong in the years to come.