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March2One Charity Raffle 2017

6 Dec

March2One’ Charity Raffle is named after World Down Syndrome Day21 March. Buy a raffle ticket, or a book to support service development of the Hong Kong Down Syndrome Association and so as to improve the quality of life of service users. The goal of the raffle is also to raise public awareness of people with Down Syndrome and other disabilities as well as the importance of the social inclusion.

List of Raffle Prizes

People with Down Syndrome and other disabilities should be respected, building friendships with us in an integrated society.

To buy raffle tickets, follow this link to HKDSA’s website and download the order form. Please fill in and send to HKDSA on or before 3 January 2018. For further enquiries, please feel free to contact HKDSA’s Administrative Assistant (Fundraising and Administrative), Ms. Shirley Chan at 3590 2565.

Deadline: 3 January 2018

Draw Date: 12 January 2018

Price: Each booklet costs HK$200 with 20 raffle tickets

About Hong Kong Down Syndrome Association: Registered as a non-profit-making organization since October 1987, the Hong Kong Down Syndrome Association is committed to serving individuals with Down Syndrome, intellectual disabilities or other disabilities and their family members with integrated family support and vocational rehabilitation services. HKDSA’s objective is to enable service users to develop their personal growth fully in every aspect of life, as well as to meet their employment and vocational training needs. In recent years, HKDSA has been expanding their social enterprises with a view of increasing vocational training and job opportunities for people with disabilities while promoting the concept of “social inclusion”.

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TWGHs Charity Challenge Race

1 Nov


Run the TWGHs Charity Challenge Race and raise money for TWGHs Development Fund for the Kwong Wah Hospital Redevelopment project.

About the Charity Challenge Race:

Route Map

The goal of this Charity Challenge Race is to raise funds for TWGHs Development Fund of Kwong Wah Hospital Redevelopment project.
* It’s a fun race with over 6 different obstacle points along the 2.5 kilometre race course to leap over.
* Event includes stage performance and game booths
* There is also a kid-zone designated for children under 12 years old

Eligibility:
* Team/ Individual Challenge Race player must be aged 12 or above
* Each team consists of 4 players (minimum 3 players) regardless of gender

Race Format:
Each team player/individual player begins at the starting point, leaping over 6 different obstacle points along the 2.5 kilometre race course to the finishing point. If player fails at the obstacle point or violates the race rules, 60 seconds will be counted as penalty. Player is required to wear a timer inside the penalty zone until penalty time is over. No interference of the timer is allowed.

Team Challenge Race (Corporate/Organization Team and Family and Friends Team)
* Team result is determined by the sum of finishing time of top three players in each team

Individual Challenge Race
* Divided into 4 age groups for male and female players. Result is determined by individual finishing time
* Age group is based on the year of birth. Applicant should register to their respective age group
(Example: If you were born in December 2005, your age group should be age 12-19)

Date: Sunday, 10 December 2017

Time: 7:15am – 12pm (Start time of different categories will be announced by early December 2017)

Place: Lung Wo Road, Central, Hong Kong

Enrollment:

Race Categories

For more information on how to register or donate, please visit their website.

About the Kwong Wah Hospital Redevelopment:

Original Kwong Wah Hospital

The Kwong Wah Hospital was established by the Tung Wah Group of Hospitals in 1911 as the first hospital in Kowloon and the New Territories.

Current Kwong Wah Hospital

The hospital underwent a redevelopment in 1958. To update facilities and to expand services a new redevelopment is underway. After this redevelopment, the hospital will provide a patient-oriented environment with the capacity and capability to deliver holistic and seamless healthcare services, in collaboration with other hospitals within the cluster. It will not only retain its role as acute hospital but provide an additional 350 beds and 10 additional operation theatres.
Other additions will include:
Emergency Services – Provision of adequate isolation facilities and 24-hour CT Scan services, and expansion of Emergency and Observation ward.
Outpatient Services – Consultation rooms for specialist out-patient will be expanded from 44 to around 100.
Day Care Medical Services – Provision of one-stop multi-disciplinary services to patients with non-acute conditions at an ambulatory care centre, facilitating patients to receive medical treatments.
New Medical Oncology Services – Including front-line management, consultation services and chemotherapy programmes.
Expanding Chinese and Western Medicine Integration Services so as to provide comprehensive Chinese and Western Medicine Hospital Services.

About Tung Wah Group of Hospitals:
TWGH is probably Hong Kong’s oldest charitable institution. The establishment of TWGHs can be traced back to Kwong Fook I-tsz, a small temple built at Tai Ping Shan Street on the Hong Kong Island in 1851 for people to house the spirit-tablets of their ancestors. As the temple was gradually taken by the sick and the destitute as a refuge, it became reeked with dirt and eventually aroused the concern of the Government and the public. Hence, a group of earnest Chinese community leaders proposed to raise funds and build a hospital in the neighbourhood. In 1869, $115,000 and a piece of land at Po Yan Street, Sheung Wan were granted by the then Governor MacDonnell. The first Chinese hospital in Hong Kong was finally built in 1870 through the enactment of the Tung Wah Hospital Ordinance. Prior to the establishment of the hospital, a temporary clinic was set up by the founding Directors near the hospital premises to offer free medical treatment to those in need. The hospital, named “Tung Wah Hospital”, was constructed in 1872 and started to provide free Chinese medicine services to the sick and the poor. It hence laid a foundation of the charitable work of TWGHs. To meet the imperative demand for medical services resulting from the rapid growth of population, Kwong Wah Hospital in Yaumatei, Kowloon and Tung Wah Eastern Hospital in Causeway Bay, Hong Kong were built and commenced operation in 1911 and 1929 respectively. In 1931, the 3 hospitals were amalgamated into the “Tung Wah Group of Hospitals” under the management of one Board of Directors.

Apart from medical care, TWGHs had been offering various social welfare and education services ever since its beginnings. When the hospital buildings were being constructed, remains were found on the site. A cemetery was then built by the founding Directors to re-bury those remains near the Slaughter House at Kennedy Town which started the Group’s provision of community services. It also started the immediate provision of alms to the needy. It provided assistance to victims whenever there were disasters, and even extended its relief work to mainland China. In 1880, TWGHs started its first free school at the Chung Wah College adjacent to Man Mo Temple on Hollywood Road with the donation income of the temple used to provide free education to the poor. In 1941, with the outbreak of the Pacific War, TWGHs insisted to provide limited medical services in Tung Wah Hospital and Kwong Wah Hospital. It also helped undertake rebuilding work including repatriation of refugees, provision of free food and clothing, taking care of the wounded and burying the dead. Medical services of TWGHs were resumed after the war. In the 1950s and 1960s, TWGHs further established primary and secondary schools and embarked on the development of formal and systematic social welfare services.

With gradual evolution over the past hundred years, TWGHs has now developed into a well-established charitable organization in Hong Kong with a huge recurrent expenditure largely subvented by the Government and only a small portion covered by service users. As TWGHs needs to shoulder the shortfall in funding as well as the cost for developing new services by raising funds from the public, holding fund-raising activities has become imperative to sustain the financial well-being of the Group. To serve the community better, TWGHs will continue to dedicate its efforts in providing diversified and high quality services for the people of Hong Kong in the years to come.

Sandy Bay Charity Fair 2017

22 Oct

The 36th Sandy Bay Charity Fair at DKCH is coming soon! Organised by The Society for the Relief of Disabled Children and with loads of bargains, yummy food, lots of fun and laughter, this is the place to spend a Saturday afternoon and get your Christmas shopping done. All net proceeds will be donated to the betterment of the donations for disabled children in Hong Kong.

Date: Saturday, 4 November 2017

Time: 10am – 5pm

Place: The Duchess of Kent Children’s Hospital at Sandy Bay, 12 Sandy Bay Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong

About The Society for the Relief of Disabled Children (SRDC): The Society for the Relief of Disabled Children (SRDC) was established in 1953, with the mission to provide medical, surgical, rehabilitation and educational services to disabled children in Hong Kong. The Society, using funds generated by the generosity of the community, established a convalescent home in Sandy Bay in 1955 for children stricken with skeletal tuberculosis. The home initially had only 50 beds but was subsequently expanded in stages to become the Duchess of Kent Children’s Hospital at Sandy Bay (DKCH) in 1968 and was in the frontline fighting against tuberculosis, poliomyelitis and spinal deformities. The Hospital subsequently became internationally recognized for this work and remains a training center for surgeons and health workers from around the world.

The Society was responsible for the running cost of the Home and Hospital and ran the institutions on a day-to-day basis until 1991 when the Hong Kong Hospital Authority took over management of all public hospitals in Hong Kong. Despite the change in management, the Society still has a significant influence in the running of the Hospital and has continued to support the Hospital with specific needs or in emerging areas of child health that are not readily available in the public health care system. They have also expanded into other areas of medical social concerns that fulfill the mission of the Society.

Currently, the Society is continuously supporting the following:
* Equipment purchase or upgrade at The Duchess of Kent Children’s Hospital at Sandy Bay
* The Kids on the Block Puppet Troupe
* Doctor Fellowship Program – Overseas Orthopaedic Surgeons
* China Patient Project
* Implant Sponsorship
* Others, e.g. clinical research at HKU

Serve-a-thon – Turn intent into ACTION

28 Mar

Despite Hong Kong’s wealth, nearly 15 per cent of residents lack the ability to meet their most basic needs. Recent studies have shown those most at risk are elderly who live alone, with 37% unable to afford the basics, and children, with more than one-fourth living below the poverty line.

What is Serve-a-thon?
Serve-a-thon Hong Kong brings together NGOs, corporates, government, media and civil society in collaboration to raise public awareness about the importance of community engagement in helping address social issues.

Over nine days, from May 6th through May 14th, the city will unite in service through hundreds of volunteer activities taking place across Hong Kong. This Hong Kong-wide ‘service marathon‘ offers volunteer opportunities for individuals, families, schools, civic organizations and corporations to come together and serve the community.

More than 75 major cities around the world host some form of service marathon. Serve-a-thon Hong Kong will be the largest-ever collective volunteerism-based event of its kind in Hong Kong. 2017 is the inaugural year of this annual event in Hong Kong.

Serve-a-thon supports those at greatest risk
*Animals
*Children and youth
*Elderly
*Environment
*Ethnic minorities
*Migrant workers
*People with disabilities
*Refugees
*Women

Why Volunteer?
Join Hong Kong’s first-ever collective service marathon and be part of this important initiative that gives back to the community:
– Learn more about Hong Kong’s pressing social issues
– Familiarize yourself with Hong Kong’s vibrant NGO sector and its valuable work serving those in need
– Sample different types of volunteer activities at different times of the week
– Participation is free for individuals and groups
– All volunteer hours will be counted and reported back following Serve-a-thon
– You can join as an individual or as a group

Date: 6-14 May 2017

Please note:
– Sign ups for activities are taken on a first come, first served basis, just simply check the calendar
– Registration is free to individuals or groups (families, friends, neighbors, schools, universities, churches, civic organizations)
– Group names will be posted on the website
– Corporations are required to follow the corporate registration procedure


The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity. These 17 goals build on the successes of the Millennium Development Goals, while including new areas such as climate change, economic inequality, innovation, sustainable consumption, peace and justice.

The volunteer opportunities within Serve-a-thon Hong Kong work to meet these global goals while serving the local community. For more information, please visit their website

About the Organisers:
HandsOn Hong Kong (HOHK) is a registered charity that mobilizes and empowers the community to meet pressing social needs in Hong Kong through volunteer services. Founded in 2007, HOHK runs more than 100 volunteer activities each month; in 2015 alone the team organized 1,436 volunteer activities and served 107,000+ beneficiaries, many of whom include children and youth, the elderly, refugees, ethnic minorities and people with disabilities.

The Hong Kong Council of Social Service (HKCSS) is a federation of non-governmental social service organizations. The establishment of the HKCSS came about after the end of the Second World War. In 1947, the HKCSS was established to co-ordinate and plan the diversification of various relief and welfare services. In 1951, the HKCSS became a statutory body under the Hong Kong Code of Practice (Cap. 1057). The rapid development of Hong Kong after the war and social welfare services has become one of the focus of government development. The HKCSS has been firmly in the position and has been an important partner in the development of social welfare since the 1970s. At present, the HKCSS has more than 450 institutional members who provide quality social welfare services to the public through its more than 3,000 service units.

Different Ways of Giving Back

2 Jan

“It is more difficult to give money away intelligently than to earn it in the first place.” – Andrew Carnegie

How can you contribute to the society by leveraging your skills? How can you measure the effectiveness and sustainability of your contribution? Whether its time or money, the challenge is finding the most impactful way to make a difference in the causes we are passionate for. In this series of “Different Ways of Giving Back” discussions as they explore how different individuals ranging from the Chairman of a property company to Social Entrepreneur, and Legal and Finance professionals in Hong Kong leverage their skills and experiences to giving back!

Event Agenda:
Different Ways of Giving Back – Finding Your Style
Getting involved – how and why
Finding the right charity and cause
Assessing the impact and sustainability of your philanthrophic actions

Presenters include:
Doris Leung – Diamond Cab Founder & CEO (Moderator)
Laurence Li – Light Be Chairman
Lehui Liang – Social Ventures Hong Kong Associate Director, Investment
Stan Tang – Stan Group Chairman
Earnest Wong – The Second Box Founder

This event will be conducted in English.

diamond-cab-2Proceeds will go to Diamond Cab to support their mission to provide legal and safe transportation services for wheelchair users in Hong Kong.

Date: Monday, 16 January 2017

Time: 7 pm

Place: 52/F, UBS AG, 2 IFC, 8 Finance Street, Hong Kong

Price: : HK$220/person
In support of Diamond Cab, buy 3 tickets now and receive 1 free miniature Diamond Cab valued at HK$560 as a gift when you present your ticket receipt upon registration.

To register, please follow this link to Eventbrite

diamond-cab-logoAbout Diamond Cab (HK) Ltd.: Diamond Cab (HK) Ltd. is a private enterprise offering point-to-point transportation services for wheelchair users. They have 7 barrier-free cabs that allow wheelchair users to board directly and provides a legal and safe transportation means for wheelchair users and their carers. Up to mid-April 2016, Diamond Cab has successfully completed over 100,000 barrier-free trips.

As the Diamond Cab brand gains publicity, Diamond Cab has encountered passengers with various backgrounds and medical conditions. In order to effectively provide safe transportation, and to allow more wheelchair users to benefit from their services, they ask passengers with individual/special requests to explain their needs in details at the time of booking. Diamond Cab hopes enterprises with a social purpose that do not accept any government or public funding can continue to operate and thrive to provide needy wheelchair passengers with the Diamond Cab experience.

Food Angel – help prep meals for the disadvantaged

27 Nov

food-angelFood Angel is a food rescue and food assistance program launched in 2011 by Bo Charity Foundation with the mission of “WASTE NOT, HUNGER NOT.” The program rescues edible surplus food from different sectors of the food industry that would otherwise be disposed of as waste. Following strict safety protocols, the rescued food items will then be prepared as nutritious hot meals in their central kitchen and be redistributed to serve the underprivileged communities in Hong Kong.

food banks  food_angel3.jpgUntil March 2011, Food Angel has provided over 2,956,453 meals and rescued over 2,474,823 kg of surplus food from going to the landfills.

food-angel-5
Beneficiaries of Food Angel include deprived elderly (71%), children from low income families (20%), the unemployed (3%), disabled and people in rehabilitation (4%) and the homeless, caged home dwellers etc (2%).

food-angel-6
Mission
– Reduce Food waste at Source
– Alleviate Hunger
– Relieve Poverty
– Educate the Next Generation

What you can to help
SCMP 03MAY13 NS CHAIWAN6  DW__6536.JPGVolunteer at one of their two kitchens in Chai Wan and Sham Shui Po where you can help prepare meal boxes: preparing raw vegetables and hot meal boxes (non-cooking duties)
To volunteer, you need to be over 16. You can volunteer as an individual or in a group. To find out about available dates and to register, please follow this link.

Beyond Vision Projects

12 Nov

BEYOND VISION PROJECTS (BVP) is a social enterprise supported by a group of passionate volunteers and professional advisors and academics in related field. In order to achieve their goal of enhancing the visually impaired (VI) and elderly with low vision’s quality of life; their first project, Tactile-Audio Interaction System (TAIS) services was successfully developed under substantial research. They got encouraging results and feedbacks which have proven TAIS can enable the mental image building process of the visually impaired (VI) and elderly with low vision.

BVP believes that art and culture inspires us, brings us together and, teaches us about who we are and the world we live in; despite the differences in age, gender, race or physical impairments. Arts and culture is for all.

Their Mission
BEYOND VISION PROJECTS (BVP) strives to enhance the quality of life of the visually impaired(VI) and elderly with low vision which focus on SOCIAL INCLUSION, SOCIAL EQUALITY and SOCIAL PARTICIPATION.

Their Goal
BEYOND VISION PROJECTS (BVP) aims at providing our Tactile-Audio Interaction System (TAIS) services: a simple-to-create ‘touch synchronized’ tactile and audio tool. This tool will enable the VI and elderly with low vision to receive visual information through touching and hearing, not limited to accessibility to art but all possible aspects of daily life. Subsequently, trainings for TAIS production and services will be provided to visually impaired individuals so as to open up job opportunities.

Training and Workshops
BEYOND VISION PROJETS (BVP) provides training and workshops; such as tactile painting making; audio description workshop and TAIS workshops, for the visually impaired, their family members and friends; as volunteer.

Training will cover:
– Tactile Painting Making
– Visual impairment awareness, customer care and guiding
– The principles of description
– Describing paintings, objects and artefacts
– Using other senses to engage blind and partially sighted visitors
– Improving accessibility, including leading an audio described tour

What you can do to help
BVP believes that people who have visual impairments should have an equal opportunity to experience art and culture, heritage and historical venues. They work with museums, galleries, schools and other organisations to provide inclusive and accessible consultations, tours and experiences. With your support; BVP can create a more accessible and inclusive society. Please contact BVP: info@beyondvision.asia for sponsorship or donations.

Or join BVP as an individual volunteer or group volunteer; by sending BVP an email (info@beyondvision.asia) with simple introduction and your intention.