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Orbis Moonwalkers 2018

21 Oct

© Orbis Hong Kong


Since it first began saving sight in the early 1980s, Orbis’ Flying Eye Hospital has pioneered quite a few historic moments – as has Hong Kong itself. And what better way to celebrate their shared ‘Golden Age’ than by travelling back in time and walking the 20km from Shatin Sports Ground to Tai Po Tai Mei Tuk during Moonwalkers 2018!

How fun is Moonwalkers? Last year, nearly 5,000 sight-savers donned black and white striped costumes in order to help conquer darkness as they walked! All donations are raised is now enabling Orbis’ sight-saving volunteers to benefit the needlessly blind by sharing the skills with local medical professionals across the developing world!

What’s new this year? Good old fashioned and newly trendy nostalgia! So read on…

VINTAGE SHOOTING SCENES

© Orbis Hong Kong

Local store? Hopscotch? Red buckets? Journey to the past as you view scenes and play games from your childhood’s ‘Good Old Days’ while you walk. Don’t forget to fully charge your phone so you can capture those memorable moments at each checkpoint!

BLINDFOLD EXPERIENCES

© Orbis Hong Kong

Discover the difficulties facing the visually impaired in Orbis’ unforgettable blindfold challenges!

NEON LIGHT PAINTINGS

© Orbis Hong Kong

Neon signs have long been a Hong Kong trademark. At Moonwalkers 2018, you won’t even have to go downtown to be bathed in such illuminations’ garish glow!

Date: Overnight from 9pm Saturday November 10, 2018 to 7am Sunday morning

Time: approximately 6 hours

Place: Shatin Sports Ground -> Tai Po Tai Mei Tuk 20km on pavement

Shuttle bus service: 1am – 7am on Sunday, November 11, 2018 from Tai Po to Shatin town centre

Minimum Sponsorship:
Individual – $780
Team of > 6 members – $780/member
Corporate > 10 members – $850/member

Deadline for enrollment: 5pm Wednesday, October 24, 2018

To enroll, please follow this link

To find out more, please email info.hk@orbis.org or call 2595 0263

About Orbis: Orbis is the result of a unique and lasting alliance forged between the medical and aviation industries. In the 1970s, leaders of these two industries came together to create the plan that led to the foundation of Orbis. Orbis knew that the high costs of tuition, international travel and accommodations prevented most doctors and nurses in low-income countries from participating in overseas training programs. Even when they could afford to study abroad, their opportunity for direct clinical experience was limited because strict licensing laws often prevented them from performing surgery.

The solution was a mobile teaching hospital. With a fully equipped hospital on board an airplane, doctors trained in the latest ophthalmic techniques, including pediatric ophthalmology, could bring their surgical knowledge and skills to doctors in low-income countries through hands-on training and lectures. A grant from USAID and funds from private donors enabled Orbis to successfully convert a DC-8 plane into a fully functional teaching eye hospital. As replacement parts for the original DC-8 plane became more difficult and expensive to obtain, it became clear that a newer, larger aircraft was needed. In 1992, after a major fundraising appeal, Orbis purchased a wide-body DC-10 to replace the DC-8. Within two years, Orbis had converted the plane into an eye surgery hospital. Orbis’ inaugural mission was to Beijing, China.

As Orbis grew over the years, Orbis added hospital-based training programs and fellowships to their portfolio to provide additional skills-building opportunities for eye care professionals. In 1999, to build the capacity of local partners, Orbis created long-term country programs in Bangladesh, China, Ethiopia, India and Vietnam – similar programs are also underway in parts of the Latin America and the Caribbean. Orbis’ permanent offices in these countries, run by local staff, develop and implement an array of multi-year projects to improve the quality and accessibility of eye care to residents, particularly in rural areas and impoverished urban communities. Many of these programs focus on the treatment and prevention of childhood blindness, cataract, trachoma and corneal disease.

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